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Foothills Artists: LeeAnn Brook, David Wong and David McKay



LEEANN BROOK FINE ART
Opened in July 2015, Lee Ann Brook Fine Art is one of the first artist-owned galleries and on-site studios in Nevada County. In the heart of historic downtown Nevada City at 231 Broad Street, the gallery is housed in a brick building from the 1800s, incorporating the working studio of LeeAnn Brook.

Visitors can see paintings in progress and discuss the art with the artist firsthand. The gallery features Brook's large format contemporary paintings, as well as the work of other local and regional artists, all in a curated setting with Japanese antiques also for sale. Upcoming shows include:

July Carol Dalton: A Moment in Earth's Time
Aug. Sandy Ostrau: Sun At My Back
Sept. Barbara Michelman: Of Land and Sky
Oct. Michael Shemchuk: Surface Tension

DAVID WONG, VISUAL STORYTELLER AND PHOTOGRAPHY TOURS
Wong is one of our area's most accomplished photographers. “Regardless of whether I am photographing a landscape, a sporting event or a portrait, creating photography that is artful is essential to me,” he says.

Wong also offers photography workshops and tours. Wong will lead a group to Paris — his 7th photography tour from Oct. 24-Nov. 3.

Photography instruction is woven into the tour through talks and tips to each location. The tour also includes visits to Rouen (where Julia Child was introduced to French cuisine), Honfleur, Normandy and Mont Saint-Michele. Visit PhotographybyDavidWong.com or call 530-852-7800 for more information.

DAVID MCKAY, FINE-ART PHOTOGRAPHER AND MASTER PRINTER
“Best photography I've ever seen of that sweet little river,” is what Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Gary Snyder said about photographer David McKay's work. Like Synder's poetry, McKay's work — in his books such as “Yuba Seasons” — tells the story of our region.

McKay has other talents as well. He is an expert at creating metal prints — of his own work, as well as his customers. “These durable, archival metal prints have a vibrant luminescence,” he says. “People that see a metal print for the first time often think the print is backlit.”